Category Archives: Padua

Today is the 400th anniversary of Tom’s Departure

A picture from Padua’s railway station Thanks Tom for inspiring my walk, changed my life – a little And in other news: the Venice bottom snapper has finally been caught. Normal walking service will shortly resume: I’m writing an academic … Continue reading

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The sons of their fathers

“The only way you know you’re not in Italy, not in Venice, when you’re at The Venetian hotel [in Las Vegas]? Easy. The water is blue, not that muddy brown green of Venice, and the Gondoliers are black.” In Padua … Continue reading

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Transmission time @ the Cappella degli Scrovegni

The strangely scientific logo for the Scrovegni museum… It is very hard to look honestly at Giotto’s art after reading Richard Dawkins’ “The God Delusion”. It is not hard to let yourself immerse in the frescos of the Scrovegni chapel … Continue reading

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Postscript to the Rain

Last night it rained for eight seconds, which still briefly emptied the square. One brave couple sat it out. I asked Luca, a waiter, what the problem was. Why were there no umbrellas. “We don’t have a licence. And to … Continue reading

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Stream of rain and consciousness

Shaun believes the English novel died in 1943 with the “Establishment’s” rejection of “Finnegans Wake”. Especially Virginia Woolf; and she was dead within a year. He is 27, tells me quickly he is “precocious”: next term he starts teaching literature … Continue reading

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Padua Requiem

“There is one speciall thing wanting in this citie, which made me not a little wonder; namely, that frequency of people which I observed in the other Italian cities. For I saw so few people here, that I thinke no … Continue reading

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Post rain music

After the first storm twenty minutes of pleasure: Ravel, Vivaldi and Bach outside the Palazzo Bo, empty streets suddenly fill, as if in reconnection with some other time when music was everywhere in the streets. The violins remind me of … Continue reading

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